Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Urban Permaculture

For those with tiiiiny gardens spend 15 minutes watching these two videos and be inspired....in my searching for information I happened onto these two videos at Youtube on Urban Permaculture Gardening.

This couple has 75 sq m available to grow vegetables and manages to grow 250kg of food per year which is much more intensive than agricultural land. Taking into account that they are in the UK and can only grow food from May - Oct this is a huge achievement. They use a combination of permaculture techniques, forest gardening and companion planting.

It's when I see something like this that I am even more inspired to use the space that I have available for growing food more effectively.




6 comments:

Mrs. Small House said...

These really inspire me to get more growing in my backyard. It's fun to see how many people are starting to do this. Thank you for sharing them!!

Wendy said...

Yes, makes one think: "If they can do it, anone can!" doesn't it?

Aurora said...

If you can get a copy Michael Guerra has written a book, 'The Edible Container Garden' which explains in depth the techniques they have used. It covers balcony, patio and roof gardening too. I have a small patio and lots of pots and it is the most useful gardening book I own. I am in the (not so warm and sunny) UK, so I imagine that you could run wild with it and be even more productive!

Tanya said...

They were wonderful to watch. Great sentiments. Wouldn't it be wonderful if their neighbours were able to participate and they could have a food and resource share between them.

Dani said...

Thanks Wendy

Brilliant link - can't help but get inspired by what they are doing / have done.

Makes what I have produced thus far in my much larger area quite pathetic. Hope to change that now...

Dani said...

Hi Wendy

I came across this video - it is pretty lengthy (48 odd minutes) but incredibly informative and thought provoking.

Roberts' description of a multi-layered forest garden is brilliant and one which we could easily use on our farm land to reduce evapouration and soil erosion.

Dani